Pet poison of the week – Azalea

PET POISON OF THE WEEK – AZALEA
Poisonous to: Cats, Dogs
Level of toxicity: Generally mild to severe, depending on the amount ingested
Common signs to watch for:
• Drooling
• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Inappetance
• Abdominal pain
• Abnormal heart rate and rhythms
• Hypotension
• Weakness
• Tremors
• Depression
• Blindness
• Seizures
• Coma
The Azalea is actually a species of Rhododendron. Over 1000 species of rhododendrons/azaleas exist. The small, deciduous species are referred to as the Azalea and the large, woody shrubs as Rhododendrons. The Rhododendron is more toxic but this can vary drastically due to the hybridization of these two common plants. These plants contain grayanotoxins which disrupt sodium channels affecting the skeletal and cardiac muscle. All parts of the plant are considered poisonous, and as little as ingestion of 0.2% of an animal’s body weight can result in poisoning. When ingested, clinical signs include gastrointestinal signs (e.g., drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, inappetance), cardiovascular (e.g., abnormal heart rate, heart arrhythmias, weakness, hypotension), and central nervous system signs (e.g., depression, tremors, transient blindness, seizures, coma, etc.). The overall prognosis is fair with treatment.
Poison type: Plants
Alternate names: Ericaceae, Rhododendron, grayanotoxin

TELEPHONE YOUR VET ASAP
REMEMBER PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN THE CURE

 

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Service Dogs UK

Save a Dog – Help a Veteran & improve the lives of both for military & emergency services veterans with PTSD

It is easy to forget, that those who serve on the frontline, be it at home or abroad, often see and experience awful things so that you and I do not have to.

But this bravery does come at a cost for some and they need your support.

donate today via ServiceDogsUK.org

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Hearing Dogs for Deaf People

Hearing Dogs for Deaf People trains dogs to respond to important sounds and danger signals such as the doorbell, alarm clock and smoke alarm.

Deafness can be incredibly isolating leaving many deaf people without the confidence to leave their homes, avoiding social situations and feeling cut off from the world. Hearing dogs provide companionship and help to reduce these feelings of isolation, stress and anxiety, and build their recipient’s confidence.

Our highly-trained dogs alert a deaf person to a sound by touching them with their paw or their nose and then leading the person to the source of the sound. In the case of danger, such as a smoke alarm, each dog is taught to lie down so their owner is aware that there is a hazard.

A hearing dog’s training takes up to 18 months including a year living with a volunteer puppy socialiser, followed by their specialist ‘soundwork’ training at one of our centres.

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Pet poison of the week – Amarylls Plants/Flowers

Poisonous to: Cats, Dogs
Level of toxicity: Generally mild to moderate
Common signs to watch for:
• Drooling
• Vomiting
• Hypotension (drop in blood pressure)
• Respiratory depression
• Abdominal discomfort

The Amaryllis is a part of the large Liliacea family but does not have the same toxic principles as the more common “true” lilies (e.g., Easter, Asiatic, Day, Japanese show, etc.). The plant contains similar toxins to the flowers in the Narcissus group or the Belladonna Amaryllis (the only true Amaryllis). The leaves, stems and bulbs contain phenanthridine alkaloids which can cause vomiting, hypotension (drop in blood pressure) and respiratory depression. Excess salivation and abdominal discomfort can be seen from the raphide oxalate crystals, which are more concentrated in the bulbs.
Poison type: Plants
Alternate names: Liliacea, Narcissus, Belladonna Amaryllis
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TELEPHONE YOUR VET ASAP
REMEMBER PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN THE CURE

Dog – Heatstroke

Heatstroke occurs when normal body mechanisms cannot keep the body’s temperature in a safe range. Animals do not have efficient cooling systems (like humans who sweat) and get overheated easily. A dog with moderate heatstroke can recover within an hour if given prompt first aid and veterinary care. Severe heatstroke can be deadly and immediate veterinary assistance is needed.

Signs

A dog suffering from heatstroke will display several signs:

  • Rapid panting
  • Bright red tongue
  • Red or pale gums
  • Thick, sticky saliva
  • Depression
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Vomiting – sometimes with blood
  • Diarrhea
  • Shock
  • Coma

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Facts about Older Dogs Nutrition

Have you ever questioned, what is in pet food, and how healthy is pet food for our pets?

I know I have, and very confused about misleading information and facts out there about our pet food.

Firstly, what happens when our dogs become senior.

  • Metabolism and energy levels can slow down and their need for calories generally decreases, due to a loss of lean tissue mass and a gain in fat mass, which can lead to weight gain if the amount of food or diet fed is not adapted accordingly.
  • Senior dogs may show a drop in activity levels and may sleep more. This could be down to a natural slow down or it could be as a result of arthritis or joint problems, which can be common in older dogs. Weight management is very important for addressing this.
  • The immune system may need some extra support
  • Dental issues can pose a problem, making chewing more difficult.
  • The senses of smell and taste can become affected and, as dogs depend very much on these senses, affected individuals may eat less because their food may appear less tasty to them.
  • A senior dog may experience a decrease in appetite and it could be as a result of some of the above changes, but the first step is to rule out any underlying health issues with your veterinary surgeon. Several health conditions more associated with old age, such as kidney disease, arthritis, heart disease and cancer, may result in weight loss.
  • Many veterinary practices run senior care programmes, which can help to pick up on any health issues at an early stage. As with every life stage, nutrition can play a key stage, nutrition can play a key support role as a dog goes through physiological changes.

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Therapy Dogs Nationwide

The lives of thousands of people are improved every single week by Therapy Dogs Nationwide.

Therapy Dogs 2017.1We are a comparatively new charity run entirely by volunteers, many of which have an enormous amount of expertise with therapy dogs.

Our much loved pets bring comfort, companionship, happiness and Therapy to those in need.

Therapy Dogs Nationwide volunteers visit a diverse range of establishments including: Stroke Units, Cancer Wards, Hospitals, Hospices, Nursing Homes, Care Homes, Mainstream and Special Needs Schools, Prisons, Remand Centres and even some Secure Hospital Wards.

Therapy Dogs 2017.2

Currently we are assisting in over 50 schools helping to improve children’s literacy skills with our ‘Paws and Read’ programme.

Children who have previously found it difficult to read are now doing so happily because of the interaction of our Therapy Dogs.

We are currently running an interesting pilot scheme in Libraries. Each weekend children come to meet our Therapy Dogs and read stories to them as part of our ‘Paws and Read’ programme. This is receiving enormous praise from both teachers and parents.

We also visit special needs schools where children may be in a wheelchair and have multiple problems. Here we use our Therapy Dogs to encourage responses from the children and to calm them if they are stressed.

In order to increase the work of Therapy Dogs Nationwide we need more people to register their dogs and volunteer to visit an establishment on a regular basis.

Visiting with a registered Therapy Dog is just about the kindest gift a dog owner can give, by sharing their own happy, friendly dog with people who are unable to have their own dog in their lives.

Therapy Dogs 2017.3

Make that next step, visit Therapy Dogs Nationwide website, TODAY!

http://www.TherapyDogsNationwide.org.uk

Pet poison of the week – Mushrooms

PET POISON OF THE WEEK – MUSHROOMS
Poisonous to: Cats, Dogs
Level of toxicity: Generally mild to severe
Common signs to watch for:
• Nausea
• Drooling
• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Abdominal pain
• Walking drunk
• Depression
• Tremors
• Seizures
• Organ failure

As accurate mushroom identification can be difficult, it should be left to experts (mycologists). While the majority of mushrooms are considered non-toxic, some may result in severe clinical signs (even death). The majority of confirmed fatal mushroom toxicities in pets are secondary to mushrooms from the following genera: Amanita, Galerina, and Lepiota. Depending on the type/species of mushroom ingested, several general organ systems can be affected: hallucinogenic (e.g., visual disturbances), gastrointestinal (e.g., vomiting, diarrhea), central nervous system (e.g., ataxia, tremors, seizures, death), liver failure (e.g., vomiting, black-tarry stool, increased liver function blood tests, etc.), kidney failure failure (e.g., halitosis, anorexia, vomiting, inappropriate thirst or urination), etc.
In general, all mushroom ingestions in veterinary patients should be considered toxic unless accurate, rapid mushroom identification can occur. Clinical signs from mushroom poisoning are dependent on the species of mushroom ingested, the specific toxin within that mushroom, and the individual’s own susceptibility. Early clinical signs include vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, walking drunk, depression, tremors, and seizures, with liver and renal damage occurring later.
If you see your dog eat a mushroom, contact your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline immediately for treatment advice.
Poison type: Foods
Alternate names: Amanitins, Amanita, Galerina, Lepiota, death cap, death angel, muscarine, Inocybe, Clitocybe, false morel, Gyromitra, hallucinogenic mushrooms, Psilocybe, Agaricus, Boletus, gastrointestinal, phalloides
Alternate names: Advil, NSAID, Motrin, Pamprin, NSAIDs

TELEPHONE YOUR VET ASAP
REMEMBER PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN THE CURE

 

How many teeth do dogs have?

Like humans, dogs have baby teeth as puppies. Due to their rapid development and maturity, they lose those baby teeth and have a full set of adult teeth by the time they’re six months old. Baby teeth are also called deciduous teeth. Like deciduous trees, which shed their leaves, the 28 teeth that puppies have and lose over the course of their first half-year are only temporary. The 42 that come in and replace them tend to last longer than human teeth because the shape of canine teeth and the tendency of dog food to be low in sugar, which means that cavities are a rare occurrence in dogs

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