Pet poison of the week – Ivy

PET POISON OF THE WEEK – IVY
Poisonous to: Cats, Dogs
Common signs to watch for:
• Drooling
• Vomiting
• Diarrhea
• Abdominal pain
Certain types of ivy plants contain triterpenoid saponins and polyacetylene compounds. When ingested by pets, the irritant within the plant can cause excessive drooling, vomiting and diarrhea.
Poison type: Plants
Alternate names: Sweetheart ivy, Glacier ivy, Needlepoint ivy, Branching ivy

TELEPHONE YOUR VET ASAP
REMEMBER PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN THE CURE

 

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Ticks and Lyme Disease in Pets

Ticks are a widespread and expanding threat across the UK. In recent years, they have begun to start feeding earlier in the year and for a longer duration of time. And ticks are not only active earlier than ever, they are also carrying potentially new and harmful diseases. All this puts your pets at a greater risk.

 

What are ticks?

Ticks have eight legs (apart from the larvae, which have six), so they are not insects, but are ARACHNIDS, and are related to spiders, mites and scorpions. They go through four stages in their life cycle – egg, larva, nymph, then adult.

Ticks 2017.4 Continue reading “Ticks and Lyme Disease in Pets”

Pet poison of the week – Fertilizers

PET POISON OF THE WEEK – FERTILIZERS
Poisonous to: Cats, Dogs
Level of toxicity: Generally mild to moderate, depending on the amount ingested and concentration of the product
Common signs to watch for:
• Drooling
• Nausea
• Vomiting (acute or delayed onset)
• Diarrhea
• Abnormal posture due to abdominal pain
• Difficulty breathing
• “Muddy” colored gums
Most fertilizers contain varying amounts of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium (potash) as indicated by the three numbers on the packaging (i.e., 30-10-10). They may also contain iron, copper, zinc, cobalt, boron, manganese and molybdenum, some of which may be toxic in large concentrations. Additionally, fertilizers may also contain herbicides, pesticides, and fungicides which increases the risk of poisoning. While small ingestions of fertilizer may only result in mild stomach upset, larger ingestions can result in severe poisoning from the iron, nitrogen and other chemicals. Large ingestions of meal-based fertilizers may also form a concretion in the stomach resulting in a bowel obstruction or severe and painful inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis).
If you think your dog or cat was exposed to fertilizer, contact your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline for treatment recommendations.
Poison type: Fertilizers
Alternate names: soil amendments, bone meal, blood meal, feather meal, plant food, potash

TELEPHONE YOUR VET ASAP
REMEMBER PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN THE CURE