Fun Facts About Dogs

German Shepherd Dog

A dog’s whiskers are touch-sensitive hairs called vibrissae. They are found on the muzzle, above the eyes and below the jaws, and can actually sense tiny changes in airflow.

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Dogs can smell about 1,000 times better than humans. While humans have 5 million smell-detecting cells, dogs have more than 220 million. The part of the brain that interprets smell is also four times larger in dogs than in humans.

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Small dogs live the longest. Toy breeds live up to 16 years or more. Larger dogs average is 7-12 years. Veterinary medicine have extended this estimate by about three years. However, some breeds, such as Tibetan terrier live as long as twenty years.

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David runs the best Pet and Canine Pet First Aid Courses.

Dog CPR 2015

 

David presented the information very clearly and made the course very interesting . It was obvious that he was very knowledgeable and had personal experience with regard to pet first aid.

Reviewed on 21 Oct 2015 for Pet First Aid course
What a terrific experience! David was very knowledgeable. He was friendly, kind and could effortlessly hold the attention of others. I can’t recommend him highly enough. Thank you David!
Reviewed on 18 Jul 2015 for Pet First Aid course

Very intuitive and happy to answer all your questions. Professional and willing to make sure you get the most out of the course and leave feeling ready to take care of any situation.

Reviewed on 14 Jul 2015 for Pet First Aid course.
Pet First Aid 2015
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Fun Facts About Dogs

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Eighty percent of dog owners buy their dogs a present for holidays and birthdays. More than half of them sign letters and cards from themselves and their pets

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Most pet owners say their pet makes them smile more than once a day.

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It has been established that people who own pets live longer, have less stress and have fewer heart attacks.

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David runs fantastic Pet and Canine First Aid Courses.

Dog CPR 2015

David presented the information very clearly and made the course very interesting . It was obvious that he was very knowledgeable and had personal experience with regard to pet first aid.

Reviewed on 21 Oct 2015 for Pet First Aid course
What a terrific experience! David was very knowledgeable. He was friendly, kind and could effortlessly hold the attention of others. I can’t recommend him highly enough. Thank you David!
Reviewed on 18 Jul 2015 for Pet First Aid course

Very intuitive and happy to answer all your questions. Professional and willing to make sure you get the most out of the course and leave feeling ready to take care of any situation.

Reviewed on 14 Jul 2015 for Pet First Aid course.
Pet First Aid 2015

Fun Facts About Dogs

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Dogs’ sense of hearing is more than ten times more acute than a human’s

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Dogs don’t like rain because the sound is amplified and huts their very sensitive ears.

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A greyhound can run as fast as 45 miles an hour

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David runs the best Pet and Canine Pet First Aid Courses in the world.

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David presented the information very clearly and made the course very interesting . It was obvious that he was very knowledgeable and had personal experience with regard to pet first aid.

Reviewed on 21 Oct 2015 for Pet First Aid course
What a terrific experience! David was very knowledgeable. He was friendly, kind and could effortlessly hold the attention of others. I can’t recommend him highly enough. Thank you David!
Reviewed on 18 Jul 2015 for Pet First Aid course

Very intuitive and happy to answer all your questions. Professional and willing to make sure you get the most out of the course and leave feeling ready to take care of any situation.

Reviewed on 14 Jul 2015 for Pet First Aid course.
Pet First Aid 2015

Our Pets at Christmas

Christmas is coming and there’s a lot to look forward to, but don’t forget the needs of your four-legged friends. With a little planning and preparation, and extra consideration for your pet on the big day, Christmas can be a truly family affair that everybody including your four-legged friend can enjoy.

Keep the routine

Although all routines tend to get thrown out of the window on Christmas Day, it’s important not to let your dog’s routine fall by the wayside. If you pet has their first meal of the day in the morning, then make sure this happens before the present opening commences. A full tummy should hopefully make your dog fell more relaxed and less eager to sniff out the Christmas chocolates.

As long as you feed and walk your dog at the times your pet is used to, disruption to their daily routine should be kept to a minimum.

Be on the lookout

There are bound to be chocolates and other human foods that are poisonous to curious pets on Christmas Day. Potentially toxic foods include Christmas pudding, mince pies, Gravy. And, the chances are, your pet will know exactly where these foods are in the house. Remember your pets are very clever, they can figure out, how to open cupboard, or climb onto a shelf, so it’s important to keep food and presents out of your pets reach, or make sure your pet is supervised. Be careful about Christmas decorations on the tree too, as although they are not necessarily toxic, tinsel or an ingested bauble could cause serious problems with your pet digestive system, and you don’t want a trip to the vet on Christmas Day.

Christmas Day

The smell of turkey cooking must be tortuous to our four-legged friends, but remember what foods is safe to humans, may not be safe to pets, for example bones in the meat, which may splinter and cause your pets to chock, and avoid gravy, which is far too salty for healthy pets, or anything fatty. It’s important not to let your pet indulge too much on Christmas Day.

Winter walkies

Christmas has to be one of the best days of the year for a dog walk. Nearly everyone you come across is in a good mood, you can wear the new scarf or socks that you unwrapped earlier in the day, you can burn off those extra calories you consumed, and it’s the perfect opportunity to get the whole family to spend some quality time together in the great outdoors.

Visitors

On and around Christmas Day you’re likely to have visitors coming to the door and also coming into the house and you don’t want them to be greeted by an out of control dog jumping up and licking them. Consider putting your dog on a lead when they arrive or, even better, consider putting in some prior training. Firstly, teach your dog  to sit away from visitors and reward them with treats for doing it. Then, ask someone to approach the pet slowly, and reward your pet for sitting. If your pet breaks the sit, then the person moves away, but as long as your pet keeps the sit, then you pet can greet the person. This takes time and patience.

Your pet is one of the family

If you’re planning on visiting your family on Christmas Day, make sure you consider where your dog is going to spend the day. In an ideal situation, your pet should come with you and join in with the fun, but this may not be practical and you may need to consider the size of house, you are visiting, how many people, including children will be there, and whether your pet would be happier staying at home. It may be best to compromise and keep any visits to see family fairly short so your pet isn’t left alone for as short time as possible. It is not advisable to keep your dog in the car; where they can’t move around, and it will probably be way too cold for them in the car.

Chill out

If you have a busy day at Christmas, the day can be a bit overwhelming for some pets, especially if they are young and have never experienced Christmas before, or if they have been recently rescued and aren’t used to lots of people. Let your pet have their chill out time, and consider move their pets bed to a quiet corner of the house, where your pet won’t be disturbed, should they want to go off for a Christmas snooze.

 

Fitzcharles Training offer Canine and First Aid courses throughout Scotland, in fact what an excellent Christmas present, for more information, check out their website.

 

http://www.fitzcharlestraining.co.uk

Drink Driving

In 2013 between 220 and 260 people were killed in accidents in the UK where at least one driver was over the drive limit. There were an estimated 240 deaths.

These figures are too high but accidents involving drink driving have decreased hugely over the last 35 years. Deaths and series injuries related to drink driving fell by more than three-quarters between 1979 and 2012.

What’s the drink driving limit in Scotland?

The alcohol limit for drivers in Scotland is different than in the rest of the UK. In December 2014 the limit was reduced to 50 milligrams of alcohol in every 100 millilitres of blood. The breath alcohol equivalent reduced to 22 micrograms of alcohol per 100 millilitres of breath.

The Scottish Government say they have changed their drink drive limit to bring Scotland in line with most other European countries, to save lives and make Scotland’s roads safer.

How much can I drink and stay under the limit?

There is no fool-proof way of drinking and staying under the limit. The amount of alcohol you would need to drink to be considered over the driving limit varies from person to person. It depends on:

  • Your weight, age, sex and metabolism (the rate your body uses energy)
  • The type and amount of alcohol, you’re drinking
  • What you’ve eaten recently
  • Your stress levels at the time

Even small amounts of alcohol can affect your ability to drive so the only safe advice is to avoid any alcohol if you are driving.

How alcohol affects driving

Many of the functions that we depend on to drive safely are affected when we drink alcohol:

  • The brain takes longer to receive messages from the eye
  • Processing information becomes more difficult
  • Instructions to the body’s muscles are delayed resulting in slower reaction times.

You can also experience blurred and double vision, which affects your ability to see things clearly while you are driving. And you’re more likely to take potentially dangerous risks because you can act on urges you normally repress.

How would I be tested for drink driving?

Even small amounts of alcohol affect your ability to drive and the only safe advice is to avoid any alcohol if you are driving.

If the police want to investigate whether you are over the drink driving limit, they will carry out a screening breath test at the roadside. To do this, they will use a breathalyser.

If you fail this test, or if they have other grounds to believe that your driving was impaired through drink, you’ll be taken to a police station and given a final breath test. At the station you will need to provide two more breath specimens into a complex breathalyser.

The lower of the two readings is used to decide whether you are above the drink driving limit. If the evidential breath sample is up to 40% over the limit you have the right to replace your breath specimen with blood or urine – the police officer will decide which test you will have. If you evidential samples show that you are over the limit, you will be charged.

The police can carry out a breathalyser test if you have committed a moving traffic offence (such as banned turns or going through a red light) been involved in an accident, or have given the police grounds to believe you are over the limit.

What’s the punishment if I get caught drink driving?

Anyone caught over the legal alcohol limit when driving will be banned from driving for at least 12 months, and fined up to £5,000. You can also be given between three to 11 penalty driving points. And you could be sent to prison for up to six months. Imprisonment, the period of disqualification, size of fine and penalty points depend on the seriousness of the offence.

If you’re caught drink driving more than once in a 10 year period, you’ll be banned for at least three years.

How to ensure you don’t drink and drive

  • Arrange within your group of friends who’s going to be the designated driver. A designated driver is the person who abstains from alcohol on a night out so they can drive the rest of their group of friends home safely.
  • If you live somewhere with good public transport links – take advantage of them. If you’re planning on staying out beyond the last train or bus, make sure you’ve got a couple of taxi numbers.
  • If you have no option but to drive, stick to zero alcohol beers, mocktails or standard soft drinks.

Burning Candles This Christmas

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Candles in the home are now getting a more and more popular way to add relaxation to our homes which has seen a large increase in the numbers of candle related incidents.

Typically each Christmas can see over 2,000 house fires due to candles, and as a result, 10 people will die, and over 900 people will be injured. Lets change this stat for next year, NOW!!

As the sale of candles has gone up by 50% this year, this trend is unfortunately going to continue unless people are educated as to the dangers of candles and the damage they can cause.

Candles mark special occasions and create a special atmosphere. They also bring fire into your home. So treat them carefully.

The Do’s and Dont’s

Always put candles on a heat resistant surface. Be especially careful with night lights and tea lights, which get hot enough to melt plastic. TVs are not fire-resistant objects.

Put them in proper holders. Candles need to be held firmly upright by the holder so they won’t fall over. The holder needs to be stable too, so it won’t fall over either.

Position them away from curtains. Don’t put candles near curtains or other fabrics or furniture. And keep them out of draughts.

Don’t put them under shelves. It’s easy to forget that there’s a lot of heat above a burning candle. If you put it under a shelf or other surface then it can burn the surface. Make sure there’s at least three feet (one metre) between a candle and any surface above it.

Keep clothes and hair away. If there’s any chance you could lean across a candle and forget it’s there, put it somewhere else. You don’t want to set fire to your clothes or your hair.

Keep children and pets away. Candles should be out of reach of children and pets.

Keep candles apart. Leave at least four inches (10cm) between two burning candles.

Take care with votive or scented candles. These kinds of candles turn to liquid to release their fragrance, so put them in a glass or metal holder.

Don’t move them when they’re burning. Extinguish candles before moving them. Also, don’t let anything fall into the hot wax like match sticks.

Don’t leave them burning. Extinguish candles before you leave a room. Never go to sleep with a candle still burning. And never leave a burning candle or oil burner in a child’s bedroom.

Use a snuffer or a spoon to put them out. It’s safer than blowing them, which can send sparks and hot wax flying.

Double-check they’re out. Candles that have been put out can go on smouldering and start a fire. Make sure they’re completely out.

From Everybody at Fitzcharles Training, we hope you have a lovely Christmas, but more importantly a safe Christmas.

Merry Christmas

Davidxx

Stay Safe at Christmas

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Christmas is a special time for celebration and should not end in tragedy because of the extra hazards that are present at this time of year.

 

Fairy Lights

1. Check the fuses are the right type (see the box for the maximum size of fuse you should use).

2. If bulbs blow, replace them.

3. Don’t leave fairy lights on when you go out or when you go to sleep.

4. Don’t let the bulbs touch anything that can burn easily, like paper.

5. Don’t overload sockets.

 

Decorations

1. Decorations made of light tissue paper or cardboard burn easily.

2. Don’t attach them to lights or heaters.

3. Don’t put them immediately above or around the fireplace.

4. Keep them away from candles.

 

Christmas Trees

Special fire safety precautions need to be taken when keeping a live tree in the house. A burning tree can rapidly fill a room with fire and deadly gases.

Selecting a Tree for Christmas

Needles on fresh trees should be green and hard to pull back from the branches, and the needle should not break if the tree has been freshly cut. The trunk should be sticky to the touch. Old trees can be identified by bouncing the tree trunk on the ground. If many needles fall off, the tree has been cut too long, has probably dried out, and is a fire hazard.

 

Caring for Your Tree

Do not place your tree close to a heat source, including a fireplace or heat vent. The heat will dry out the tree, causing it to be more easily ignited by heat, flame or sparks. Be careful not to drop or flick cigarette ashes near a tree. Do not put your live tree up too early or leave it up for longer than two weeks. Keep the tree stand filled with water at all times.

 

Disposing of Your Tree

Never put tree branches or needles in a fireplace or wood burning stove. When the tree becomes dry, discard it promptly. The best way to dispose of your tree is by taking it to a recycling centre or have it taken away by a community pickup service.

 

From everybody at Fitzcharles Training, we hope you will have an enjoyable Christmas, but most importantly, we want you to have a safe Christmas.

David xx

Keep your pets safe this Christmas

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PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN THE CURE

Please take a few minutes to learn about potentially hazardous objects and how you can prevent illness or injury to your pets.

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The festive season for most of us means the Christmas decorations come out of the loft and are delicately placed throughout our homes to provide that festive environment we all love. Those same shiny, pretty, fragile objects that we enjoy looking at also catch the attention of our pets. Cats love to climb up the Christmas tree and start batting at the tree ornaments. While some dogs may think all their Christmas’ and birthday have come at once with all those baubles!

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The Christmas Tree

The best place to put a Christmas tree is in a room that is off limits to your pets. The entire Christmas tree can be knocked over by a dog running through the room or tugging at the pretty strings of lights. A cat climbing up the Christmas tree can cause the entire tree to come crashing down.

Decorations, like tinsel, light and ornaments, are often too much for a cat or dog to resist. Wooden plastic and glass decorations can easily be ingested or smashed, either way potentially very dangerous to your pet.

Some pets find the flashing lights of great interest and chewing on these presents a danger of electrical shock, cutting their mouths and ingesting glass.

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String

Whether it is used to hang cards, decorations or wrapped around your turkey, String is a serious hazard to pets. We have removed several lengths from the intestines of dogs and cats over the years. Cats love to play with string and dogs particularly love the meaty flavoured variety taken from your turkey.

Ensure you dispose of all string especially those from your meat or turkey immediately after removal and keep out of reach of pets.

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Turkey

Whilst lean turkey may cause nothing more than a tummy upset in some pets the carcass can cause serious problems. Bones from your choice of poultry or indeed meat can become lodged in the mouth throat or tummy. Cooked bones often shatter leaving sharp edges to penetrate through stomach and gut walls. Do not feed bones and if your pet happens to eat a bone contact your local vet.

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Christmas Dining

An abundance of food on our dining tables presents a danger not only to our waist lines but to the health of our pets. Fat-ladened scraps of food fed to dogs and cats can cause vomiting and diarrhoea but more importantly pancreatitis.

Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas, causing leakage of digestive enzymes and the pancreas to “digest itself”. Pancreatitis is a very painful disease which is difficult to treat and can prove to be fatal. Please avoid feeding your pet scraps of food they are not used to eating.

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Chocolate

Chocolate contains Theobromine a chemical very toxic to pets. Milk and white chocolate tend to contact less Theobromine whereas a very small amount of dark chocolate can be fatal. One small bar (50g) of milk chocolate can be poisonous to a small dog but less than half a bar of dark chocolate could cause serious problems. Cats are even more sensitive to Theobromine poisoning than dogs!

If your dog happens to steal one or two milk buttons don’t panic but please be aware than even a small bar of chocolate can be toxic. If you pet ingests chocolate you must contact your vet as soon as possible. Speedy treatment can be the difference between life and death.

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Antifreeze

The sweet taste of antifreeze attracts dogs and cats to drinking it. Unfortunately it is very toxic and ingestion is often fatal. If you suspect your pet may have swallowed antifreeze please contact your vet immediately. Clean up any spillages and keep out of reach of your pet.

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Grapes and Raisins

A common toxicity in dogs, grapes and raisins cause severe kidney disease and may even result in death if eaten. There is much individual variation to the sensitivity, so consult the vet even if a very small number have been consumed.

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Sweets and Liquorice

Sweets and liquorice tend to have a laxative effect, especially in dogs. Keep your sweet treats away from your pets.

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Fireworks and busy homes

Firework displays are becoming increasingly common around Christmas and New Year. Most homes transform at Christmas time with extra guests or visitors, excited children and new objects making their way into the home, some pets can find this really stressful. Try and keep your pet calm, there are lots of helpful tips and treatments, ask your vet for more information.

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Gift wrap & bows

Remember what we said about string? Bows and gift wrapping can be ingested and cause a blockage requiring surgery. Keep out of reach of pets.

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Alcohol

Keep your half empty tins or glasses out of reach as some pets love the taste. Alcohol in pets can result in tragedy, as heart arrhythmias, seizures, tremors and death are a very real possibility in a pet that is untreated after consuming alcohol.

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Plants

Festive plants such as Poinsettia, Mistletoe and Holly all look very pretty and bring the festive feel to any home. However, all of these plants are toxic to pets and although small amounts are not usually fatal they tend to cause hypersalivation, vomiting and diarrhoea.

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From everybody at Fitzcharles Traning, we wish you and all your lovely pets a wonderful, but safe Christmas.

Why not treat yourself to a Pet First Aid course next year, and learn more, how to prevent, but also how to do first aid on our pets. Fitzcharles Training are very proud to offer Pet and for the first time Canine Pet First courses.

Merry Christmas

David xx