The Importance of knowing CPR

The community response to cardiac arrest is critical to saving lives. Each year, UK ambulance services respond to approximately 60,000 cases of suspected cardiac arrest. Resuscitation is attempted by ambulance services in less than half of these cases (approximately 28,000). The main reasons are that either the victim has been dead for several hours or has not received bystander CPR so by the time the emergency services arrive the person has died.

Even when resuscitation is attempted, less than one in ten victims survive to go home from hospital. Strengthening the community response to cardiac arrest by training and empowering more bystanders to perform CPR and increasing the use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) at least doubles the chances of survival and could save thousands of lives each year.

Immediate CPR is vital if the person is to have the best chance of survival. In other videos we will look at CPR and chest only compressions, which are simple things that you can do to save someone’s life. CPR is frightening but with basic training, should the need arise, you will be able to do it to the best of your ability. This training will come back to you when you need it.

Fitzcharles Training are very proud to offer this live saving course, and remember it maybe a loved one at home that you may have to use this lives saving skill. All our First Aid courses now include the AED certificate.

 

AED 2015.6

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Drink driving

 

The Highway Code applies to England, Scotland and Wales and is essential reading for everyone.
Rule 95

Do not drink and drive as it will seriously affect your judgement and abilities.

In England and Wales you MUST NOT drive with a breath alcohol level higher than 35 microgrammes/100 millilitres of breath or a blood alcohol level of more than 80 milligrammes/100 millilitres of blood.

In Scotland the legal limits are lower. You MUST NOT drive with a breath alcohol level higher than 22 microgrammes/100 millilitres of breath or a blood alcohol level of more than 50 milligrammes/100 millilitres of blood.

Alcohol will

  • give a false sense of confidence
  • reduce co-ordination and slow down reactions
  • affect judgement of speed, distance and risk
  • reduce your driving ability, even if you’re below the legal limit
  • take time to leave your body; you may be unfit to drive in the evening after drinking at lunchtime, or in the morning after drinking the previous evening.

The best solution is not to drink at all when planning to drive because any amount of alcohol affects your ability to drive safely. If you are going to drink, arrange another means of transport.