Featured

Drink driving

 

The Highway Code applies to England, Scotland and Wales and is essential reading for everyone.
Rule 95

Do not drink and drive as it will seriously affect your judgement and abilities.

In England and Wales you MUST NOT drive with a breath alcohol level higher than 35 microgrammes/100 millilitres of breath or a blood alcohol level of more than 80 milligrammes/100 millilitres of blood.

In Scotland the legal limits are lower. You MUST NOT drive with a breath alcohol level higher than 22 microgrammes/100 millilitres of breath or a blood alcohol level of more than 50 milligrammes/100 millilitres of blood.

Alcohol will

  • give a false sense of confidence
  • reduce co-ordination and slow down reactions
  • affect judgement of speed, distance and risk
  • reduce your driving ability, even if you’re below the legal limit
  • take time to leave your body; you may be unfit to drive in the evening after drinking at lunchtime, or in the morning after drinking the previous evening.

The best solution is not to drink at all when planning to drive because any amount of alcohol affects your ability to drive safely. If you are going to drink, arrange another means of transport.

Check out this drug-driving film

Nose games with your dog Part 1

Whether it’s big, round, and the palest pink or small, pointy and glossy black – you can’t miss it, it’s right there in the middle of your dog’s face: its nose. You’ve probably heard all sorts of stories about the nose, from the amazing feats of scent detection it can perform, to its use as an indicator of general dog health. Here are a few common questions and myths

Continue reading “Nose games with your dog Part 1”

Advertisements

Blind Dog Rescue UK

I’m always amazed, when I find out new charities that I haven’t ever heard of before, the good work these charities do, and this is one of them.

Blind Dog Rescue UK rescue, rehabilitate and rehome blind and partially sighted dogs through the UK and Europe. We believe blind dogs have the potential to live amazing lives and do all we can to ensure our dogs are given this chance.

We help dogs in the UK, Spain, Romania, Greece, Cyprus, Serbia, Portugal, Russia and Croatia. Blind Dog Rescue UK believes in helping dogs in need regardless of their geographical location.

We offer support and advice to owners of blind and partially sighted dogs. Many owners are incredibly worried about the impending or sudden loss of their pet’s sight. We can teach owners how to care for their pets and help them live a happy life.

Support and Donate directly on the charity own website.

Blind Dog Rescue 2017.2

 

blingdogrescueuk.com

 

 

Pet poison of the week – Batteries

PET POISON OF THE WEEK – BATTERIES
Poisonous to: Cats, Dogs
Level of toxicity: Generally moderate to severe
Common signs to watch for:
• Drooling
• Oral pain
• Pawing at the mouth
• Vomiting
• Inappetance
• Difficulty swallowing
• Lack of defecation
• Abdominal pain
• Fever
Batteries can be very dangerous when ingested by dogs. When a battery is punctured or swallowed, there is risk for the alkaline or acidic material to leak out, resulting in severe corrosive injury. The most common types of batteries ingested or chewed on by dogs are alkaline dry cell battery (e.g., 9-volt, D, C, AA, AAA) or button/disc batteries. Disc-shaped batteries or lithium batteries are also very dangerous due to corrosive injury.
If a battery is ingested, the mouth should be carefully flushed for 15-20 minutes with tepid water. Dogs that ingest batteries should not have vomiting induced, as the corrosive liquid can rupture or severely damage the esophagus! Immediate veterinary attention is required after initially flushing of the mouth. X-rays should be performed; if the battery is seen in the body based on the x-rays, prompt removal is important (e.g., by endoscopy or surgery). Note that ulcers in the mouth may not be observed for hours after battery ingestion.
If you think your dog ate a battery, call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline immediately for treatment recommendations.
Poison type: Household Items
Alternate names: AA, AAA, dry cell, lithium, battery, disc, alkaline, acidic, corrosive, button battery, batteries, heavy metal, corrosive

TELEPHONE YOUR VET ASAP
REMEMBER PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN THE CURE

 

Is it safe to give dogs bones?

Feeding bones to dogs is controversial. Evidence suggests chewing bones is good for dogs in some ways, yet bad in other ways.

  • Bones are a natural source of calcium and phosphorus.
  • Chewing stimulates the jaw and prevents boredom.
  • Bones can break teeth and cause damage to the enamel.
  • Booked bones are brittle and splinter. Splinters can perforate the intestines.
  • Type of bones: Raw bones don’t splinter, but may contain bacteria that cause diarrhea and illness.
  • Never feed raw pork, with or without bones.
  • Work with a holistic veterinarian to determine what’s best for your pet.

Someone told me not to feed my dog chicken bones, why?

Cooked chicken bones may splinter and damage the stomach and intestines. Raw bones do not normally splinter. Many pets enjoy chewing raw chicken or turkey necks and raw chicken wings that are free of salmonella and other bacteria. Raw beef knuckle bones are also delicious treats. Ask your local veterinarian to do what is best for your individual pet.

Rawhide dog bones

Rawhide is probably one of the most popular dog chews on the market, but their are concerns regarding the safety of rawhide dog chews.

The Good:

  • It promotes healthy gums and teeth in dogs.
  • It prevents dogs from chewing valuable items at home.
  • It relieves teething pain that most puppies struggle with.
  • Your dog will likely love them

The Bad:

  • It can be a chock hazard. Once your dog swallows a tiny, broken piece of rawhide, that portion can get lodged in their throat; putting them in serious danger. To avoid this, immediately take the rawhide away as soon as it becomes small enough to be swallowed whole.
  • It can cause a digestive blockage. Allowing your dog to swallow a large piece of rawhide can also endanger their life. It could cause a fatal blockage, it can even wrap around their intestines.
  • It can cause gastrointestinal problems. If your pooch ingests too many rawhides, they may develop gastrointestinal complications.
  • Not all rawhides are safe to eat. Several reports have revealed that rawhides may be made from toxic chemicals. Try and only buy UK, be aware of cheap non British standards products.
  • Some rawhides contain deadly poisons. This process of making rawhides involves chemically separating the out layer of skin from the hid. This process leaves deadly poisons in the chew, including arsenic and formaldehyde.
  • Some rawhides contain skin from dogs.

Taking your pets for Drive

We often spend lots of time discussing safe ways to transport of furry friends in our cars, so here some of my tips.

The UK Highway Code states that dogs must be suitably restrained when in a vehicle so that they cannot distract you while you are driving or injure you, or themselves, if you stop quickly. Make sure you have a seat belt harness or suitable method such as a dog guard or crate for restraining your dog in the car.

PLAN AHEAD

Pet restraints, toys, leads, treats, food, medication, drying towel, drinking bowl, bottles of water, clean kit (when you pet has been sick), pet first aid kit and I sure you can think of many more things to take. Keep a separate dog travel bay, already for travelling.

Suitable car for your pets

When choosing a new car think about the size of your pet, as one consideration,

  • Are they able to jump in and out of the car (think of older dogs, getting a brt frail, are we able to assist them in and out of the car)
  • Consider buying a ramp
  • A hatchback or small car is perfect for smaller pets. They have room for some extra gear or a carrier, and allow sufficient space for your pet to stand up and stretch their legs.
  • Larger dogs tend to mean bigger vehicles.
  • Consider buying a pet crate for the car, remember safety, your dog needs to be secure, check your vehicle insurance covers pets in cars
  • Air-Conditioning is another consideration, some cars have different temperature settings to allow the car to be cooler in the back.
  • Tinted windows another good option, but never be tempted to leave a dog in the car, even with the window open, even in Scotland it only takes 6 minutes to kill a dog on a sunny warm day.
  • Dog restraints that allow you to belt your dog in the regular seat belt. Poorly made restraints, may not be suitable for your pet, in fact it could become a strangling hazard. Dog restraints, will also allow you drive safely without additional distractions that your pet may cause you.
  • Pet Guard, not only does it stop your pet from flying forward, when you hit the brakes, it also helps to keep your car upholstery in pristine condition.
  • Mat/travel bed, making the car trip, just a bit more comfortable, and some familiar smells of home, lovely!
  • 2017-71

Continue reading “Taking your pets for Drive”

Pet Toys

General Tips

  • Avoid balls with single air holes, which can create a deadly suction trap, sticks and stones, heavily dyed toys, toys treated with fire retardants or stain guard, soft plastics.
  • Watch you pets, when they are playing
  • Choose toys that fit your dog size, and avoid toys that could slip to the back of the mouth.
  • Select toys that match your dog’s play style.
  • Keep a variety of toys types on hand, rotate to spark your dog’s interest.

 

Continue reading “Pet Toys”

Pet poison of the week – Beta Blockers

PET POISON OF THE WEEK – BETA BLOCKERS
Poisonous to: Cats, Dogs
Level of toxicity: Generally moderate to severe
Common signs to watch for:
• Nausea
• Vomiting
• Weakness
• Collapse
• Slowed heart rate
• Lethargy
Beta-blockers are a common type of heart medication used in both human and veterinary medicine for heart disease and for blood pressure regulation. While beta-blockers are commonly used in cats and dogs, accidental overdose can result in severe, life-threatening poisoning due to the drug’s narrow margin of safety. This means that only a small amount of the drug can result in severe poisoning. Overdose can result in heart failure, a very slowed heart rate, severe hypotension (low blood pressure), and secondary acute kidney failure. Aggressive and immediate treatment must be initiated, and includes decontamination, heart and blood pressure monitoring, aggressive IV fluids, blood work monitoring, and symptomatic supportive care. With severe toxicosis, the use of high-dose insulin therapy or intravenous lipid emulsion can be used.
If you think your dog or cat were poisoned by a beta-blocker heart medication, call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline immediately for life-saving treatment advice.
Poison type: Medications
Alternate names: cardiac medication, heart medication, atenolol, carvedilol, esmolol, labetalol, metoprolol, nadolol, nebivolol, propranolol, sotalol, timolol

TELEPHONE YOUR VET ASAP
REMEMBER PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN THE CURE

 

Heartworm in Dogs and Cats

Heartworm disease is a serious and potentially fatal disease in pets. It is caused by worms that live in the heart, lungs and associated blood vessels of affected pets, causing severe lung disease, heart failure and damage to other organs in the body. Heartworm disease affects dogs, cats and ferrets.

Dogs

The dog is a natural host for heartworms, which means that heartworms that live inside the dog mature into adults, mate and produce offspring. If untreated, their numbers can increase, and dogs have been known to harbour several worms in their bodies. Heartworm disease causes lasting damage to the heart, lungs and arteries, and can affect the dog’s heath and quality of life long after the parasites are gone. For this reason, prevention is by far the best option, and treatment, when needed, should be administered as early in the course of the disease as possible.

Cats

Heartworm disease in cats is very different from heartworm disease in dogs. The cat is an atypical host for heartworms, and most worms in cats do not survive to the adult stage. Cats with adult heartworms typically have just one to three worms, and many cats affected by heartworms have no adult worms. While this means heartworm disease often goes undiagnosed in cats, it’s important to understand that even immature worms cause real damage in the form of a condition known as heartworm associated respiratory disease. Moreover, the medication used to treat heartworm infections in dogs cannot be used in cats, so prevention is the only means of protecting cats from the effects of heartworm disease.

How is heartworm disease transmitted from one pet to another?

The mosquito plays an essential role in the heartworm life cycle. Adult female heartworms living in an infected dog or fox produce microscopic baby worms that circulate in the bloodstream. When a mosquito bites and takes a blood meal from an infected animal, it picks up these baby worms, which develop and mature into ‘infective stage’ larvae over a period of 10 to 14 days. Then, when the infected mosquito bites another dog or cat, the infective larvae are deposited onto the surface of the animal’s skin and enter the new host through the mosquito’s bite wound.

Once inside a new host, it takes approximately 6 months for the larvae to mature into adult heartworms.

Once mature, heartworms can live 5 to 7 years in dogs and up to 2 or 3 years in cats. Because of the longevity of these worms, each mosquito season can lead to an increasing number of worms of an infected pet.

What are the signs of heartworm disease in dogs?

In the early stages of the disease, many dogs show few symptoms or no symptoms at all. The longer the infection persists, the more symptoms will develop. Active dogs, dogs heavily infected with heartworms, or those with other health problems often show pronounced clinical signs.

Signs of heartworm disease may include a mild persistent cough, reluctance to exercise, fatigue after moderate activity, decreased appetite, and weight loss. As heartworm disease progresses, pets may develop heart failure and the appearance of swollen belly due to excess fluid in the abdomen. Dogs with large numbers of heartworms can develop a sudden blockages of blood flow within the heart leading to a life threatening form of cardiovascular collapse. This is called caval syndrome, and is marked by sudden onset of laboured breathing, pale gums, and dark bloody or coffee-coloured urine. Without prompt surgical removal of the heartworm blockage, few dogs survive.

What are the signs of heartworm disease in cats?

Signs of heartworm disease in cats can be very subtle or very dramatic. Symptoms may include coughing, asthma-like attacks, periodic vomiting, lack of appetite, or weight loss. Occasionally an affected cat may have difficulty walking, experience fainting or seizures, or suffer from fluid accumulation in the abdomen. Unfortunately, the first sign in some cases is sudden collapse of the cat, or sudden death.

What can I do to, if I think my pet has heartworm?

The earlier it is detected, the better the chances the pet will recover. There are few, if any, early signs of disease when a dog or cat is infected with heartworms, so detecting their presence with a heartworm test administered by a vet is important. The test requires just a small blood sample from your pet, and it works by detecting the presence of heartworm proteins.

What happens if my dog tests positive for heartworms?

No one wants to hear that their dog has heartworm, but the good news is that most infected dogs can be successfully treated. The goal is to first stabilize your dog if he is showing signs of disease, then kill all adult and immature worms while keep the side effects of treatment to a minimum.

 

Making a 999 or 112 Call

This is something we get wrong often, have a think now, would you know what information you may be asked, and simply what to expect, we make a 999 or 112 call. To make things worse there are a few myths surrounding making an emergency call.

Lets keep it simple, and here are the facts.

Firstly 999 or 112

In the UK the numbers 999 or 112 can be used interchangeably. 999 is the traditional UK phone number, and 112 is the standard European Union emergency number. The 112 number should work in any country that is part of the European Union, 999 will only work in the UK.

Emergency calls are free

There is no charge for making a call to an emergency number (999 or 112). It doesn’t matter whether you are using a payphone, or landline, or a mobile. This is a requirement of UK law, so no operator will charge for these emergency calls.

Emergency calls for non-English speakers

The emergency service operators can engage a telephone translation service for non-English speakers. The first thing the operator will try and do is to establish the language that the person is speaking and then join in a translator.

Know where you are!

When making an emergency phone call you need to know where you are. If you are making the call from a land-line, and in particular using the emergency phones on the motorway, then they can trace your location from the phone, but they do not have the same accuracy with a mobile phone. If you do not know where you are, try and use a land-line phone, or find a street name. If using a mobile phone from a motorway or major A road, look for the market signs which indicate your exact location (every 100 metres).

 

HOW TO MAKE A 999 OR 112 CALL Continue reading “Making a 999 or 112 Call”

Blood Donation For Canines

Nobody can disagree how important donating blood is, but did you know that there is a shortage of blood for our Canines, when they need it.

Here are some facts about Blood Donation For Canines!

What happens at a blood collection session?

The comfort and health of donor dogs is of paramount importance and the donation process should be as relaxed and enjoyable as possible for all involved.

  1. The appointment is split into two parts:
  • Health and suitability check with a fully qualified vet
  • Donation

2. The vet will go through the following process with your dog prior to any donation going ahead:

  • undertake a physical examination of your dog and takes its health history
  • carefully clip and clean a small area of your dog’s neck
  • microchip your dog if it not already microchipped

If all is well, you dog will go through to the donation room where a fully qualified phlebotomist will draw about 450ml of your dog’s blood.

Once the donation is made your dog will be brought to the refreshment area for a well earned drink and snack.

You are then ready to go home, some dogs may want to take it easy for a little while, but many will get on with their normal routine.

In total, you should allow around 40 minutes for your appointment, although the actual donation process only takes 5 and 10 minutes.

Continue reading “Blood Donation For Canines”